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Emergencies in the Dental Office


 


Emergency Medicine Part 9: Cardiac Arrest
Member Price: $98.00
CE Credit(s): 2
Retail Price: $138.00
Course Created on: 08/31/2016
/education/ViewCourse.aspx?id=110|33677
Description:

Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart ceases to pump blood. The victim – unconscious, not breathing, and with no blood pressure – will die unless effective resuscitative efforts are commenced immediately. This program discusses the recognition and management of cardiac arrest emphasizing the importance of basic life support (CPR) and defibrillation (AED) in improving the chances for a successful outcome.

 

Learning Objective:

  1. Discuss survival rates for out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest in adults and in children
  2. List and describe the steps of the BLS-HCP algorithm (the ‘Chain of Survival’)
  3. Explain the rationale behind the change in technique of BLS from A-B-C to C-A-B
  4. Name the ‘shockable’ rhythms of cardiac arrest
  5. Name the 4 rhythms of cardiac arrest
  6. Discuss the automated external defibrillator (AED)

Abstracts:

More than 360,000 deaths from sudden cardiac arrest occur in the United States annually – approximately 1,000 every day. The causes of cardiac arrest, in both adult and pediatric patients, are reviewed along with the presenting premonitory signs & symptoms that lead to sudden cardiac arrest.  Management of cardiac arrest – the successful resuscitation of the victim without brain damage – is predicated on circulating blood containing oxygen to the heart and brain and delivering an electric shock (defibrillation) as soon as possible after collapse. The use of an AED and its mechanism of action is discussed.

Outline:

  1. Introduction
    1. The Heart
      1. Function of the heart is to pump
      2. Coronary arteries
        1. Coronary artery disease
    2. What is a ‘heart attack’?
      1. Myocardial infarction versus cardiac arrest
  2. Acute myocardial infarction
  3. Management
    1. Classical signs & symptoms
    2. Pre-hospital management
      1. PCAB
      2. MONA
    3. Acute MI dysrhythmias
      1. PVCs signs & symptoms
  4. Sudden cardiac arrest
    1. When does AMI degenerate into SCA?
    2. Definition of cardiac arrest
    3. Cardiac arrest rhythms
      1. Shockable rhythms
        1. Ventricular tachycardia
        2. Ventricular fibrillation
      2. Non-shockable rhythms
        1. Asystole
        2. Pulseless electrical activity (PEA)
    4. Signs & symptoms of cardiac arrest
      1. Clinical death
      2. Biological (cellular) death
    5. Management of cardiac arrest
      1. PCABD
      2. Survival from cardiac arrest
        1. The importance of time
        2. The importance of bystander initiated BLS
        3. The importance of defibrillation
      3. 2010 American Heart Association algorithms for BLS
        1. Lay-person CPR
        2. Heathcare Provider CPR
        3. Review of BLS for Healthcare provider guidelines and changes from previous guidelines
      4. Defibrillation
        1. The importance of time from collapse to defibrillation
        2. AEDs
          1. How to use an AED
          2. How an AED works
    6. Pediatric cardiac arrest
      1. Etiologies
        1. Airway obstruction most common cause in younger children
      2. Prevention of pediatric cardiac arrest
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Emergency Medicine Part 7: Drug Overdoses
Member Price: $98.00
CE Credit(s): 2
Retail Price: $138.00
Course Created on: 08/13/2018
/education/ViewCourse.aspx?id=99|32811
Description:

Updated for 2018
Systemic adverse drug reactions (ADRs) may occur any time a drug is administered to a patient. This program describes allergy, overdose and idiosyncrasy, and goes on to discuss the problem of local anesthetic overdose and overdose of sedative drugs, their prevention, recognition and management.

 

Learning Objectives:

 

  1. Name the three categories of adverse drug reaction
  2. Differentiate between allergy and overdose
  3. Name the target organs for local anesthetics and sedative agents
  4. List the etiologies of local anesthetic overdose
  5. Describe the signs & symptoms of local anesthetic overdose
  6. Describe management of local anesthetic overdose

Abstract:

The administration and prescription of drugs is essential in the contemporary practice of dentistry. Antibiotics, Analgesics, Local Anesthetics, and Sedatives are the most common drug categories used in dentistry. Adverse drug reactions can always occur when drugs are administered. Allergy, overdose and idiosyncrasy are the three systemic adverse drug reactions. They are defined and contrasted, followed by an in-depth discussion of overdose of local anesthetics and sedatives.

 

Outline:

  1. Introduction
  2. Overdose
  3. Local anesthetic overdose
  4. Sedative drug overdose
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Emergency Medicine Part 8: Chest Pain
Member Price: $49.00
CE Credit(s): 1
Retail Price: $69.00
Course Created on: 08/13/2018
/education/ViewCourse.aspx?id=114|33681
Description:

Updated for 2018
This program discusses acute coronary syndrome – angina pectoris and myocardial infarction – conditions that initially manifest themselves as ‘chest pain.’ The prevention, recognition and management of angina pectoris and myocardial infarction are reviewed in-depth.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Compare the 3 types of angina pectoris
  2. Discuss the management of angina pectoris
  3. List the situations when chest ‘pain’ occurs that a myocardial infarction should be considered
  4. Define and describe the 4 steps in the prehospital management of a suspected myocardial infarction
  5. Distinguish between the pain of angina pectoris and that of acute myocardial infarction
  6. Discuss the ‘Silent MI’

 

Abstract:

 

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Acute coronary syndrome includes angina pectoris and acute myocardial infarction. Each of these will be described in detail and the prevention, recognition and management of each reviewed. The ‘Silent MI,’ most commonly seen in women, elderly and diabetics will be discussed.

Outline:

  1. Introduction
  2. Chest ‘pain'
  3. Angina pectoris
  4. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI)
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Emergency Medicine Part 5: Respiratory Distress
Member Price: $98.00
CE Credit(s): 2
Retail Price: $138.00
Course Created on: 08/10/2018
/education/ViewCourse.aspx?id=97|32531
Description:

Updated for 2018
Bronchospasm and hyperventilation are not uncommon emergencies in the dental office. Additionally foreign body airway obstruction has occurred with patients aspirating and choking small dental devices. This program reviews the prevention, recognition and management of some common causes of respiratory distress.

Learning Objectives:

 

  1. List four causes of respiratory distress in the dental environment
  2. Describe the dialogue history for asthma
  3. Describe management of acute bronchospasm
  4. Describe the pathophysiology of hyperventilation
  5. Describe management of hyperventilation
  6. List common etiologies of heart failure
  7. Describe the pathophysiology of heart failure
  8. List the signs & symptoms of left or right heart failure
  9. Describe acute pulmonary edema & its management
  10. Describe management of the obstructed airway in the adult & young child

Abstract:

A conscious patient complaining of difficulty breathing forms the basis of this section on respiratory distress. The discussion includes four common causes of respiratory distress: bronchospasm (asthma); hyperventilation; heart failure & acute pulmonary edema; and foreign body airway obstruction (FBAO). Prevention, recognition and management of each problem is discussed in depth.

 

Outline:

  1. Introduction
  2. Asthma (Bronchospasm, Hyperactive airway disease)
  • Hyperventilation
  • Heart failure & acute pulmonary edema
  • Foreign body airway obstruction (FBAO)
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    Emergency Medicine Part 6: Drug Allergies
    Member Price: $98.00
    CE Credit(s): 2
    Retail Price: $138.00
    Course Created on: 08/10/2018
    /education/ViewCourse.aspx?id=98|32810
    Description:

    Updated for 2018
    Most allergic reactions are relatively mild and non-life-threatening, however some are acutely life-threatening – anaphylaxis. This program reviews the prevention, recognition and management of allergic reactions in the dental office environment.

    Learning Objectves:

    1. Differentiate between allergy and overdose
    2. Discuss the mechanism of allergic reactions
    3. Describe management of a delayed onset allergic skin reaction
    4. Define anaphylaxis
    5. List common etiologies of anaphylaxis
    6. Describe the signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis
    7. Describe the management protocol for anaphylaxis
    8. Discuss the rationale for the statement that “epinephrine is the most important drug in emergency medicine.”

    Abstract:

    Allergy, overdose and idiosyncrasy are the three systemic adverse drug reactions. They are defined and contrasted, followed by an in-depth discussion of allergy. The mechanism behind the allergic reaction is reviewed followed by a review of the more commonly observed non-life threatening allergic reaction as well as the life-threatening allergy – anaphylaxis.

    Outline:

    1. Introduction
    2. Allergy]
    3. Anaphylaxis
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    Emergency Medicine Part 4: Altered Consciousness
    Member Price: $98.00
    CE Credit(s): 2
    Retail Price: $138.00
    Course Created on: 08/09/2018
    /education/ViewCourse.aspx?id=96|32530
    Description:

    Updated for 2018
    Syncope, hypoglycemia and seizures are not uncommon emergencies in the dental office. This program reviews the prevention, recognition and management of these common causes of altered consciousness

     

    Learning Objectives:

     

    1. Define ‘altered consciousness’
    2. List three common causes of altered consciousness in the dental environment
    3. Describe the management of hypoglycemia in the conscious patient
    4. Describe the management of hypoglycemia in the unconscious patient
    5. List four common causes of seizures in the dental environment
    6. Describe the management of seizures in the dental environment
    7. List common etiologies of syncope in the dental environment
    8. Describe the pathophysiology of syncope
    9. Describe the management of syncope

     

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    Emergency Medicine Part 2: Preparation
    Member Price: $98.00
    CE Credit(s): 2
    Retail Price: $138.00
    Course Created on: 08/07/2018
    /education/ViewCourse.aspx?id=79|28321
    Description:

    Updated for 2018
    Preparation of the office and staff for medical emergencies that will inevitably occur is discussed in this course. Basic life support; an in-office emergency response team; activating emergency medical services; and emergency drugs & equipment are reviewed.

     

    Learning Objectives:

     

    1. Define the legal obligation of a doctor to the victim of a medical emergency
    2. List the 4 components of preparation of the office for medical emergencies
    3. Describe the victim who is "clinically dead."
    4. Describe the difference between "clinical" and "biological" death
    5. List and describe the steps in the AHA 2010 cardiac arrest algorithm
    6. List and describe the steps in the algorithm for all medical emergencies
    7. Explain why survival rates from sudden cardiac arrest are significantly lower in young children than in adults
    8. Describe the functions of each member of the In-Office Emergency Team
    9. List the 7 drugs in the bare-bones-basic emergency drug kit

    Abstract:

     

    Not all medical emergency situations can be prevented. In this section we discuss the preparation of the dental office & staff to (1) prevent, (2) recognize and (3) efficiently manage those medical emergencies that might arise. The importance of basic life support; development of an in-office emergency response team; (3) activation of emergency medical services; and (4) a basic emergency drug kit & equipment will be discussed.

    Outline:

    Not all medical emergency situations can be prevented. In this section we discuss the preparation of the dental office & staff to (1) prevent, (2) recognize and (3) efficiently manage those medical emergencies that might arise. The importance of basic life support; development of an in-office emergency response team; (3) activation of emergency medical services; and (4) a basic emergency drug kit & equipment will be discussed.

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    Emergency Medicine Part 3: Basic Management
    Member Price: $49.00
    CE Credit(s): 1
    Retail Price: $69.00
    Course Created on: 08/07/2018
    /education/ViewCourse.aspx?id=82|31763
    Description:

    Updated for 2018
    This program reviews the basic management protocol for all medical emergencies occurring in the dental office environment –P-C-A-B-D (Positioning – Circulation – Airway – Breathing – Definitive Care). 

     

    Learning Objectives:

     
    1. List the steps in the Basic Algorithm in Managing Medical Emergencies
    2. Describe each of the steps of the Basic Algorithm
    3. Describe the proper positioning for patients during a medical emergency
    4. Describe the method of assessing airway patency and of managing a patent airway
    5. Describe the method of assessing breathing and of ventilating an apneic patient
    6. Describe the method of assessing circulation
    7. List and discuss the use of advanced airway devices

    Abstract:

     

    In this section the basic management of all medical emergencies is introduced. The algorithm is P-C-A-B-D – Positioning – Circulation – Airway – Breathing – Definitive Care. Each of these steps is described for (1) the conscious patient and (2) the unconscious patient.

    Outline:

    1. Introduction
      1. Legal obligation of healthcare provider in medical emergency
    2. Recognition & diagnosis of emergency situation
      1. By patient
        1. Angina pectoris
        2. Bronchospasm (asthma)
      2. By doctor or dental staff
        1. Diagnosis based on response – or lack of – to emergency treatment
          1. Syncope
          2. Cardiac arrest
          3. Hypoglycemia
      3. Through recognition of presenting signs & symptoms 
    3. The basic emergency management algorithm: P – C – A – B – D
      1. P = Positioning of victim
        1. Conscious
        2. Unconscious
      2. C = Circulation
        1. Conscious
        2. Unconscious
      3. A = Airway
        1. Conscious
        2. Unconscious
      4. B = Breathing
        1. Conscious
        2. Unconscious
      5. D = Definitive care
        1. Diagnosis
        2. Drugs
        3. Defibrillation
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    Emergency Medicine Part 1: Prevention
    Member Price: $49.00
    CE Credit(s): 1
    Retail Price: $69.00
    Course Created on: 08/06/2018
    /education/ViewCourse.aspx?id=71|22598
    Description:

    Updated for 2018
    This course describes the most common medical emergencies occurring in the dental environment and describes the steps necessary to prevent their occurrence: the medical history questionnaire, monitoring of vital signs; dialogue history, and the stress reduction protocol. A physical evaluation system is introduced.

    Learning Objectives:

     

    1. List the most common medical emergencies occurring in the dental environment
    2. List the 5 components of physical evaluation of dental patients
    3. List the 4 vital signs
    4. Describe the A.S.A. physical status classification system
    5. Provide examples of ASA 1, 2, 3, and 4 medical problems
    6. List the 8 components of the Stress Reduction Protocol
    7. Define the goal of physical evaluation

    Abstract:

     

    Medical emergencies can, and do, happen in the dental environment. Approximately 75% of these can be prevented through physical evaluation of the prospective dental patient, using a systematic review of the patient’s medical history and recording of vital signs. Assigning an ASA Physical Status can help to distinguish those patients who represent greater-than-usual risk during the planned dental treatment. The Stress-Reduction Protocol can then be utilized to minimize this risk.

    Outline:

    1. Medical emergencies in dentistry
      1. What happens?
      2. When do they happen?
      3. Can they be prevented?
    2. Prevention of medical emergencies
      1. Medical History Questionnaire
      2. Dialogue History
      3. Physical evaluation
        1. Vital signs
          1. Blood pressure
          2. Heart rate & rhythm
          3. Respiratory rate
          4. Height
          5. Weight & BMI
          6. Body temperature
      4. Risk Status Classification
        1. American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status
      5. Classification System
      6. Stress-reduction protocols
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