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Prosthodontics


 


Clinical Complications In Fixed Prosthodontics: Causes, Prevention, and Management, Part 3
Member Price: $49.00
CE Credit(s): 1
Retail Price: $69.00
Course Created on: 05/28/2014
/education/ViewCourse.aspx?id=65|22368
Description:

The most common clinical complications associated with resin bonded prostheses are identified along with methods of minimizing or preventing them. Methods of managing the complications are described when they do occur.

 

Learning Objectives:

 
  1. Describe the indications and limitations of resin bonded prostheses
  2. Identify the most common complications associated with resin bonded prostheses
  3. Know the debond rate associated with resin bonded prostheses
  4. Discuss the diagnosis and treatment planning factors that affect debonding
  5. Describe the tooth preparation features that reduce or eliminate complications
  6. Identify the appropriate metal thicknesses required in frameworks
  7. Describe the methods used to retain resin cements to the metal framework
  8. Discuss the appropriate cementation protocol

Abstract:

 

Knowledge of the factors that cause complications and failure in fixed prosthodontics enhances our ability to develop effective treatment plans, facilitates success, promotes optimal doctor-patient communication regarding anticipated treatment outcomes and provides early diagnosis of problems encountered during long-term maintenance. This presentation will identify the most common complications encountered with resin bonded prostheses and describe methods of minimizing or preventing their occurrence as well as managing the complications when they occur.

 

Outline:

  1. Indications and limitations of resin bonded prostheses
  2. Most common complications that occur with resin bonded prostheses
  3. Debond rates
  4. Diagnosis and treatment planning factors that affect debonding
    1. Diagnosis and treatment planning
      1. Effect of span length
      2. Effect of occlusal forces
      3. Effect of mouth location, gender, and age
  5. Incidence of tooth discoloration
  6. Caries incidence
  7. Porcelain fracture incidence
  8. Effect upon periodontal health
  9. Cantilever designs and their impact upon success
  10. Other diagnosis and treatment planning factors
    1. Tooth condition
    2. Mesiodistal dimension of edentulous space
    3. Abutment tooth contours
    4. Effect of splinting and multiple adjoining retainers
    5. Impact of mobile abutment teeth
    6. Effect of tooth translucency
  11. Tooth preparation principles
    1. Area of tooth coverageCoverage of proximal and lingual surfaces
    2. Preparing proximal surfaces so they are faciolingually convex
    3. Creating adequate occlusal clearance
    4. Use of a peripheral finish line
    5. Benefit of lingual ledges or occlusal rests
    6. Impact of proximal grooves
    7. Use of a proximal groove combined with lingual groove(s)
  12. Design, thickness, and fit
    1. Metal thickness dimensions
    2. Cement-metal retention mechanisms
  13. Cementation guidelines
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All-Ceramic and Metal-Ceramic Restorations for Optimal Esthetics Part 1
Member Price: $98.00
CE Credit(s): 2
Retail Price: $138.00
Course Created on: 05/28/2014
/education/ViewCourse.aspx?id=37|22541
Description:

Metal-ceramic crowns have been widely and successfully used to many decades but today there are more all-ceramic restorations being placed.  This presentation will compare the two types of restorations based on the factors most important to dentists and their patients.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Compare the esthetic benefits and limitations of each type of crown
  2. Evaluate the soft tissue response and biocompatibility associated with each crown
  3. Describe the mechanical complications that can occur with both types of crowns
  4. Compare the benefits and limitations of veneered all-ceramic crowns versus monolithic designs
  5. Compare zirconia and lithium disilicate fixed partial dentures with metal-ceramic fixed partial dentures
  6. Compare the fabrication accuracy and fit

 

Abstract:

The quest for optimal esthetics coupled with the increased strength of all-ceramic materials has led to a significant increase in the clinical use of all-ceramic crowns and fixed partial dentures.  This presentation will identify the key factors that should be considered when determining whether to use all-ceramic crowns or metal-ceramic crowns.

 

Outline:

  1. What are the esthetic advantages of all-ceramic crowns?
  2. Side-by-side esthetic comparison of all-ceramic and metal-ceramic crowns
  3. How do the different types of all-ceramic crowns compare esthetically?
  4. The soft tissue response to both types of crowns
  5. Biocompatibility considerations
  6. Metal-ceramic crown survival data and veneer chipping
  7. Zirconia and lithium disilicate veneer chipping
  8. Lithium disilicate and zirconia fixed partial denture strength and failure
  9. Metal-ceramic versus all-ceramic fixed partial dentures
  10. Accuracy of fabrication and fit
  11. Cost comparison
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Clinical Complications In Fixed Prosthodontics: Causes, Prevention, and Management, Part 2
Member Price: $49.00
CE Credit(s): 1
Retail Price: $69.00
Course Created on: 05/28/2014
/education/ViewCourse.aspx?id=42|22560
Description:

The most common clinical complications associated with all-ceramic crowns are identified along with methods of minimizing or preventing them. Methods of managing the complications are described when they do occur.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Understand the benefits of all-ceramic crowns compared with metal-ceramic crowns
  2. Identify the most common complications associated with all-ceramic crowns
  3. Understand the benefits and limitations of all-ceramic crowns
  4. Identify the factors that increase the potential for crown fracture 
  5. Develop methods to minimize or eliminate crown fracture

Abstract:

 

Knowledge of the factors that cause complications and failure in fixed prosthodontics enhances our ability to develop effective treatment plans, facilitates success, promotes optimal doctor-patient communication regarding anticipated treatment outcomes and provides early diagnosis of problems encountered during long-term maintenance. This presentation will identify the most common complications encountered with all-ceramic crowns and describe methods of minimizing or preventing their occurrence as well as managing the complications when they occur.

 

Outline:

  1. The benefits of all-ceramic crowns
  2. The most common all-ceramic crown complications
  3. How to minimize all-ceramic crown fracture
    1. Effect of arch position
    2. Effect of tooth preparation
    3. Type of material used
    4. Type of cement used
  4. CAD/CAM all-ceramic crown materials
  5. Effect of gender on crown fracture
  6. Pulpal necrosis incidence
  7. Impact of all-ceramic crowns on caries incidence
  8. Impact of all-ceramic crowns on periodontal health
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Clinical Complications In Fixed Prosthodontics: Causes, Prevention, and Management, Part 4
Member Price: $98.00
CE Credit(s): 2
Retail Price: $139.00
Course Created on: 05/28/2014
/education/ViewCourse.aspx?id=48|22563
Description:

Soft tissue complications present biologic problems that can lead to bone and implant loss and this presentation will discuss the factors that cause such problems occur and how they could have been minimized or avoided.

 

Learning Objectives:

Identify the types of soft tissue complications that occur with dental implants and their incidence
  1. Know how to avoid or minimize these complications
  2. Understand contemporary cementation guidelines regarding technique and materials
  3. Discuss the space required for appropriate implant placement
  4. Describe the bioesthetic guidelines for anterior teeth
  5. Predict interproximal soft tissue esthetics prior to implant placement
  6. Predict midfacial soft tissue esthetics prior to implant placement
  7. Know the factors that cause mucosal recessions and methods of minimizing recession
  8. Describe the crown contours that promote favorable soft tissue positioning
  9. Understand facial growth changes that occur during adolescence and continue throughout life

Abstract:

 

Soft tissue complications present biologic problems that can lead to bone and implant loss.  In the anterior esthetic zone of patients with high smile lines, unesthetic soft tissue changes can occur that require special knowledge to avoid the changes.  This presentation will identify how biologic and esthetic mucosal problems occur and how they could have been minimized or avoided.

Outline:

  1. Incidence of implant fenestration/dehiscence
  2. Incidences and causes of gingival inflammation/proliferation
  3. Incidence and causes of fistulas
  4. Effect of residual cement on fistula development
  5. Cementation guidelines
  6. Space requirements for implant placement
    1. Space required between adjacent teeth
    2. Space required between implant and adjacent natural teeth
    3. Space needed between adjacent implants
  7. Bioesthetic guidelines for anterior single implants
    1. Mediolateral implant positioning guidelines
    2. Apical implant positioning guidelines
    3. Faciolingual implant positioning guidelines
    4. What bone grafting does and does not do
  8. Challenges associated with the peri-implant mucosa and interdental papilla
  9. Predicting interproximal soft tissue esthetics
    1. Effect of periodontal biotype
    2. Effect of distance from interproximal bone crest to proximal contact
    3. Effect of adjacent natural tooth or implant
    4. Effect of long epithelial attachments
  10. Predicting the midfacial soft tissue location after extraction and implant placement
    1. Incisocervical location of midfacial bone crest
    2. Incisocervical implant location
    3. Facial implant position/angulation
    4. Proximity of implant to facial bone
    5. Faciolingual thickness of facial bone
  11. Factors causing mucosal recession around implants
  12. Methods of minimizing recession around implants
  13. Affect of crown contours on soft tissue health, position, and contours
  14. The S-shaped crown form
  15. Compromised mucosal outcomes and their management
  16. Facial growth changes during adolescence and during aging
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Clinical Complications In Fixed Prosthodontics: Causes, Prevention, and Management, Part 5
Member Price: $49.00
CE Credit(s): 1
Retail Price: $69.00
Course Created on: 05/28/2014
/education/ViewCourse.aspx?id=59|22591
Description:

A large number of mechanical complications have been reported in the dental literature that could have been prevented through proper planning and design. This presentation will review the complications and discuss how to avoid unfavorable loading.

 

Learning Objectives:

 

  1. Identify the most common mechanical complications associated with dental implants
  2. Understand the factors that create overloading of implants and prostheses
  3. Understand the importance of implant placement in minimizing complications
  4. Discuss the factors that affect implant loading
  5. Know how to design single crowns and fixed partial dentures that resist adverse leverage when the implant positions cannot or are not ideal

Abstract:

 

Several mechanical complications have been reported in the dental literature.  When proper design guidelines are followed, many of these complications can be minimized or avoided.  This presentation identifies the most common mechanical complications and presents guidelines that help prevent adverse leverage on implants.  Additionally, when implant placement cannot be ideal or the implants are not appropriately positioned, this presentation describes methods that can be used to resist adverse leverage with both implant single crowns and implant fixed partial dentures.

Outline:

  1. Most common mechanical complications
  2. Ceramic veneer fracture incidence of causes
  3. Abutment screw loosening incidence
  4. Importance of knowing abutment screw access hole location of cemented crowns
  5. Abutment screw and abutment fracture causes
  6. Implant fracture and causes
  7. Guidelines for avoiding mechanical complications
    1. Anterior biomechanical guidelines
    2. Posterior biomechanical guidelines
  8. Methods of resisting adverse leverage with implant single crowns
  9. Factors affecting implant loading
    1. Cuspal inclination
    2. Implant inclination
    3. Horizontal implant offset
    4. Apical implant offset
  10. Methods of resisting adverse leverage with implant fixed partial dentures
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Clinical Complications In Fixed Prosthodontics: Causes, Prevention, and Management, Part 1
Member Price: $49.00
CE Credit(s): 1
Retail Price: $69.00
Course Created on: 05/28/2014
/education/ViewCourse.aspx?id=35|22594
Description:

The most common clinical complications associated with metal-ceramic and all-metal restorations are identified along with methods of minimizing or preventing them. Methods of managing the complications are described when they do occur.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify the most common complications associated with single crowns
  2. Identify the most common complications associated with fixed partial dentures
  3. Describe caries prevention strategies through diagnostic testing of caries risk
  4. Outline a plan of caries prevention for high risk individuals
  5. Identify the sources of pulpal stress associated with clinical crown procedures
  6. Know the three key factors that prevent loss of retention
  7. Develop strategies that can be used to minimize or eliminate loss of retention
  8. Describe methods that can be used to increase resistance form when deficiencies are present
  9. Identify the benefit of circumferential irregularities
  10. Describe where circumferential irregularities are best located

 

Abstract:

Knowledge of the factors that cause complications and failure in fixed prosthodontics enhances our ability to develop effective treatment plans, facilitates success, promotes optimal doctor-patient communication regarding anticipated treatment outcomes and provides early diagnosis of problems encountered during long-term maintenance. This presentation will identify the most common complications encountered with conventional single crowns and conventional fixed partial dentures and describe methods of minimizing or preventing their occurrence as well as managing the complications when they occur.

 

Outline:

  1. The most common single crown complications
  2. The most common fixed partial denture complications
  3. Preventing fixed partial dentures complications
  4. How to prevent caries
    1. Caries risk assessment
    2. Diagnostic testing of caries risk
    3. Caries prevention for high risk individuals
    4. Use of fluoride-releasing cements
  5. Preventing pulpal necrosis
  6. Preventing loss of retention through good tooth preparation
    1. What is an appropriate total occlusal convergence angle?
    2. What is the minimal occlusocervical dimension?
    3. What should the occlusocervical-faciolingual ratio be?
  7. What can be done when tooth preparation deficiencies are present?
  8. Guidelines for placement of created circumferential irregularities
  9. Which type of circumferential irregularity produces the greatest benefit?
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All-Ceramic and Metal-Ceramic Restorations for Optimal Esthetics Part 2
Member Price: $98.00
CE Credit(s): 2
Retail Price: $138.00
Course Created on: 05/28/2014
/education/ViewCourse.aspx?id=72|22599
Description:

There are a number of factors that must be determined both during diagnosis and during treatment to provide optimal success with all-ceramic crowns.  This presentation will describe these factors that optimize success.

 

Learning Objectives:

 

  1. Know the diagnosis and treatment planning factors that affect success
  2. Understand the tooth preparations features that minimize complications
  3. Compare the characteristics of zirconia and lithium disilicate crowns
  4. Understand the cementation procedures that optimize all-ceramic crowns
  5. Know how to optimize the shade selection process when using all-ceramic crowns

Abstract:

 

The quest for optimal esthetics along with the development of increased strength in the materials available for fabricating all-ceramic crowns has led to a significant increase in their clinical use.  This presentation lists the most common complications that occur with all-ceramic crowns and discusses the diagnosis/treatment planning factors and tooth preparation factors that help to minimize crown fracture.  Additionally, the tooth preparation factors required to optimize the CAD/CAM fabrication process are identified. The effect of the type of material and cementation process are described along with a discussion of ceramic onlays and inlays.  The presentation ends by illustrating the process by which the color of all-ceramic crowns can be optimized.

Outline:

  1. The most common all-ceramic crown complications
  2. Diagnosis and treatment planning factors that minimize fracture
  3. Tooth preparation factors that minimize fracture
    1. Amount of reduction
    2. Axial reduction uniformity and depth
    3. Incisocervical/occlusocervical dimension
    4. Line angle form
    5. Total occlusal convergence
  4. What tooth preparation form is required for CAD/CAM crowns?
  5. Comparison of different types of materials
  6. Veneer chipping
  7. Type of cement and crown survival
  8. What do we know about ceramic onlays and inlays?
  9. How to optimize the color of all-ceramic crowns
    1. Video showing shade guide use
    2. Video showing digital shade selection
    3. Identification of translucent and transparent areas
    4. Dentin shade selection
    5. Gingival shade selection
    6. Digital image requirements
    7. Use of contraster
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Treatment of a Failing Dentition Part 1: Diagnosis and Prognosis
Member Price: $49.00
CE Credit(s): 1
Retail Price: $69.00
Course Created on: 04/25/2014
/education/ViewCourse.aspx?id=40|22556
Description:

This video will allow the viewer to observe the first appointment the patient and dentist meet and the importance of developing a mutual understanding of patient expectations and dentist methods of obtaining vital information prior to accepting to perform the dental procedures. A series of questions followed by an examination will allow a thorough assessment and eliminate any misconceptions that many times occurs for first time patients having total mouth extractions. The evaluation highlights will be demonstrated as it actually happens from a list of questions fol-lowed by an esthetic analysis, radiograph review, patients existing occlusal vertical dimension compared to rest vertical dimension and final discussion with patient before committing to treatment. Please join us for Part I.

 

Learning Objectives:

 
  1. Implement making facial recordings to determine the esthetic & functional spaces.
  2. Ask predetermined questions at the assessment to improve patient dentist relationship.
  3. Understand and inform patient whether a fixed, hybrid or stud retention prosthesis is optimal
  4. Educating patient at the exam and or consultation appointment can prevent failures
  5. Determining the outcome before committing to treating any patient.

Abstract:

The treatment options available for a patient with non-restorable dentition with closed vertical occlusion combined with a moderate skeletal class 3 relationship are conventional complete dentures, implant-supported overdentures (removable), fixed implant-supported complete dentures, and fixed metal-ceramic implant-supported restorations.

Choosing the appropriate procedures whether bone trim, orthognathic surgery and or implant therapy is crucial to plan before edentulating the patient. Also of great importance is  pre-determination of the final appearance based on what the patient presents with and what can be accomplished under those circum-stances. The decision process to restore a patient with implant fixed or removable restorations should be determined by evaluating various parameters such as:

  1. Overall patient  general health
  2. Facial asymmetry
  3. Facial contour as either void or full
  4. Lip-line & lip support
  5. Quality and quantity of hard- and soft tissues
  6. The maxilla-mandibular relationship
  7. Oral hygiene traits
  8. Existing occlusal and skeletal relationship
  9. Patient understands and accepts all risk
  10. Patient financially able to have procedure performed

 

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Treatment of a Failing Dentition Part 2: Fabrication of Immediates to Extractions to Implant
Member Price: $49.00
CE Credit(s): 1
Retail Price: $69.00
Course Created on: 04/25/2014
/education/ViewCourse.aspx?id=73|22600
Description:

This video will allow the viewer to observe the steps in fabrication of provisional maxillary and mandibu-lar prostheses along with extractions, bone reduction and implant placement with the utilization of a spe-cifically designed bone reduction glide followed by an implant osteotomy guide and mandibular implant placement.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Implement taking patient recordings and fabricating the prostheses.
  2. Understand and implement facial recordings to determine the esthetic & functional spaces.
  3. Implement scanning both the jaws and the prostheses to fabricate surgical guides.
  4. Understand and be able to execute whether or not bone reduction will be needed to conform to the optimal final prosthesis.
  5. Convert a complete denture to a fixed denture directly after implant placement.
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