Skip to main content
Toggle Menu of ADA WebSites
ADA Websites
Partnerships and Commissions
Toggle Member Links
Toggle Menu

 

Stay Ahead of the Curve with CE Online

Looking for new CE courses but don't know where to start? CE Online updates and expands its library every month. View our most recent courses.

New Courses
Open Tabs
  • Enamel remineralization therapies for treating p...
  • To what extent are impacted canines associated w...
  • Assessing the validity of existing dental sealan...
  • Change Management with Dr. Kathy O'Loughlin
  • Local Anesthesia Part 9: What's New in Dental Lo...
  • Local Anesthesia Part 8: Articaine - Is it the I...
  • Local Anesthesia Parts 6 & 7: Local and Systemic...


Enamel remineralization therapies for treating postorthodontic white-spot lesions

JADA September 2018

One of the adverse effects of orthodontic treatment is the appearance of white-spot lesions (WSLs) resulting from enamel demineralization. The objective of this systematic review was to investigate the effectiveness of remineralization therapies on WSLs after orthodontic treatment.

Key Words: White-spot lesion; enamel demineralization; remineralization; fluoride.


View Course


To what extent are impacted canines associated with root resorption of the adjacent tooth?

JADA September 2018

The authors’ aim in this systematic review was to evaluate to what extent impacted canines are associated with root resorption (RR) of the adjacent tooth by using cone-beam computed tomography.

Key Words: Root resorption; impacted tooth; ectopic tooth; systematic review.


View Course


Assessing the validity of existing dental sealant quality measures

JADA September 2018

Although sealants are highly effective in preventing caries in children, placement rates continue to be low. The authors’ goals were to implement and assess the performance of 2 existing sealant quality measures against a manual audit of charts at 4 dental institutions and to identify measurement gaps that may be filled by using data from electronic health records.

Key Words: Dental sealants; oral health; quality of care; caries risk assessment; caries.


View Course


Change Management with Dr. Kathy O'Loughlin

Learn why your organization must embrace change from Dr. Kathy O'Loughlin, Executive Director of the American Dental Association.  In this course, Dr. O'Loughlin discusses the need for leaders to be champions of change and tactics to lead your teams through modern transitions.


View Course


Local Anesthesia Part 9: What's New in Dental Local Anesthesia?

Updated for 2018

Though local anesthetics are safe and effective, considerable research is on-going to make them even more effective. Computer-controlled local anesthetic delivery systems (C-CLAD) and buffered local anesthetic solutions promise to allow painless injections to be delivered to dental patients almost anywhere in the oral cavity. Fear of injections is primarily based on the needle. The development of an intranasal local anesthetic mist has been shown to provide successful pulpal anesthesia of maxillary teeth – without a needle. Epinephrine is added to injectable local anesthetics to increase their effectiveness, duration and safety. However the duration of residual soft tissue anesthesia – usually unnecessary and occasionally a potential danger – is extended when epinephrine is used in the anesthetic solution. Self-inflicted soft tissue injury is a real problem associated with this anesthesia in all patient age groups but especially pediatric and geriatric patients. Phentolamine mesylate – an alpha adrenergic antagonist – has been shown to significantly reduce the duration of residual soft tissue anesthesia when administered at the conclusion of the traumatic part of dental treatment.

 

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Discuss the current research on intranasal local anesthesia in dentistry
  2. Describe the effect of pH on the onset, depth & comfort of anesthesia with local anesthetics
  3. Describe the mechanism of action of the buffering agent sodium bicarbonate on local anesthetics
  4. List the benefits of local anesthetic buffering in dentistry
  5. Discuss the local anesthetic reversal agent - phentolamine mesylate
  6. Describe the advantages & disadvantages of Computer-Controlled Local Anesthetic Delivery (C-CLAD)
  7. Describe the clinical effects of the intranasal local anesthetic mist


View Course


Local Anesthesia Part 8: Articaine - Is it the IDEAL local anesthetic for dentistry? Facts & Fiction

Updated for 2018

Articaine HCl was introduced in the USA in 2000 and has become a very popular anesthetic agent. Though classified as an amide local anesthetic it is actually a hybrid molecule, possessing both ester and amide characteristics. With epinephrine, articaine provides approximately 60 minutes of pulpal anesthesia and between 3 to 5 hours of soft tissue anesthesia. Its unique molecular characteristics make articaine a preferred anesthetic in the pregnant and the nursing patient as well as the lighter weight (<30kg) pediatric patient. However, articaine is used as a 4% solution and there has been some concern about the possibility of 4% anesthetics possessing a greater risk of producing paresthesia than local anesthetics used in lesser concentrations.

This program provides an in-depth look at articaine, its advantages and disadvantages when compared with other commonly used dental local anesthetics. We also discuss the ‘controversy’ alleging an increased risk of paresthesia following administration of 4% local anesthetics.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the clinical characteristics that make articaine HCl ‘different’
  2. Compare articaine HCl clinically to other dental local anesthetics
  3. Discuss the use of articaine HCl in pediatrics; (2) pregnancy and (3) nursing
  4. Discuss the use of articaine HCl in (1) pregnancy and (2) nursing
  5. Discuss the ‘controversy’ over prolonged anesthesia (paresthesia) as related to injectable local anesthetics in dentistry


View Course


Local Anesthesia Parts 6 & 7: Local and Systemic Complications

Updated for 2018

Complications associated with local anesthetic administration are rare. This program discusses complications occurring in and around the site of local anesthetic drug administration - facial nerve paralysis, hematoma, paresthesia, trismus and needle breakage, their prevention, recognition and management as well as the two systemic adverse drug reactions – allergy and overdose – are reviewed as each relates to the administration of local anesthetic drugs.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Name 5 localized complications associated with administration of dental local anesthetics
  2. Discuss the mechanism of and signs & symptoms associated with multiple complications
  3. Name the three systemic adverse drug reactions (ADRs)
  4. Discuss the differences between allergy & overdose
  5. List the components of a local anesthetic cartridge and potential allergic reactions
  6. Describe the signs & symptoms of local anesthetic overdose


View Course

2018 Course Updates

Dr Geza Terezhalmy

ADA CE Online adds and updates courses monthly to help you achieve your best. Check out the updated multi-part series from known expert Dr. Geza Terezhalmy on various facets of Pharmacology including topics such as antibacterial agents, analgesics, the top 200 prescription drugs, and more.

 

About ADA CE Online

ADA’s Online CE platform provides trusted education to dental professionals at your convenience.  Our ever-growing catalog of clinical, practice management, and personal development education offers peer-reviewed continuing education credits to fit your resources and schedule.  Credits earned through this platform are maintained for all users in an online transcript that you can access when you need your verification letters.

ADA CERP logo

Recognition Statement

The ADA is a CERP Recognized Provider. ADA CERP is a service of the American Dental Association to assist dental professionals in identifying quality providers of continuing dental education. ADA CERP does not approve or endorse individual courses or instructors, nor does it imply acceptance of credit hours by boards of dentistry.